The Parthenon Sculpture Gallery
USC Institute for Creative Technologies   Basel Skulpturhalle   VCG CNR-Pisa
Home    Galleries    Videos    Publications    Credits   

The Parthenon: Film

Parthenon Caryatid Gallery

Across from the Parthenon, is a building called the Erechtheion. The Erechtheion has a porch supported by six caryatid columns. Each column is an individually shaped woman. This is one of the columns. Please note that these are low-res models at 10% of the scanned polygons.

Parthenon Frieze Gallery

Considered by some to be the most unique and refined of the Parthenon sculptures, the frieze was carved into the blocks of the inner colonnade. The frieze sculptures stand about one meter tall, and once ran continuously for 160 meters around the four sides of the Parthenon. Carved in low relief, the frieze is believed to depict the Panathenaic Procession. Large sections of the north and south frieze were destroyed in an explosion in 1687. Please note that these are low-res models at 10% of the scanned polygons.

Parthenon Metope Gallery

In Greek, the word "metope" means "between the eyes". The metope sculptures of the Parthenon are believed to have been given this name because they were placed between triglyphs, which are simple carved panels with three vertical ridges. The alternating sequence of triglyphs and metopes were placed on the outer colonnade. Each metope measured 1.2 meters high, and averaged 1.25 meters in width. Today, only fifty-two metopes of the original ninety-two still exist. The best preserved of these, along the south face, are thought to depict a battle between the Greeks and a race of centaurs. Please note that these are low-res models at 10% of the scanned polygons.

Parthenon Pedimen Gallery

Located at the ends of the triangular roof of the Parthenon, the pediment sculptures were carved larger than life and are thought to depict two legends of the Greek goddess Athena. They were carved in the round, and would have stood 5 meters at the highest point. Many of the pediment sculptures exist only as fragments. In the Basel Skulpturhalle, the casts of these fragments have been placed in Styrofoam reconstructions of the missing pieces, and these are included in the scans. The pediment sculptures were only scanned from the front, and at low resolution. Please note that these are low-res models at 10% of the scanned polygons.